10 Signs You’re Being Raised by a Nurse

There are lots of nurses in my family, including my mother, who has been a nursery nurse for almost 40 years. So I know a thing or two about being raised by a nurse…

You have to be bleeding to death or unconscious to go to the emergency room. When my dad started complaining of chest pain in the middle of the night and said he wanted to go to the ER, my mom warned him that it better not be his gallbladder. Halfway to the ER, she made him go back home so she could get her scrubs… you know, ’cause she worked the next day :/ Needless to say, it was not his gallbladder. You don’t have to be in the healthcare profession to guess what was going on, he was having a heart attack.  I’m so glad he’s still around to not let her live that one down…Oh, and she didn’t notify any of her kids until the next morning, because “he didn’t die,” and she didn’t want to wake us up. I found out from a coworker who called me and said she was praying for our family :/

Dinner conversations are graphic. Think your day was bad?!? Asking a nurse about their day prompts a story that is borderline perverse and grotesque.  Hands down, their.day.was.worse, trust me.  And anyone who has ever eaten with a nurse knows that eventually the weirdest, grossest, craziest, and best parts of their day will be retold ❤

You have a healthy fear of coming within a 15 foot radius of them when they get home from work. You may not be sure if you can even get HIV or Hep B that way… But you’ll stay over here just in case.  At least until they strip down and bathe in 103 degree water.  It’s weird how they rarely get sick or worry about catching whatever their patient is trying to dish out, but they are very concerned about passing anything to you. 

Seriously?!?
Seriously?!?

They have almost any medication you could ever need in their medicine cabinet (or purse).  You know, just in case there’s an apocalypse, or a sudden national shortage of Amoxicillin.  It may be 3 years old, but hey, they have it if you need it 😃 Have a headache? We got you covered. Upset stomach? Here you go. Nauseated? Here’s just what you need…

They work weird days of the week, and their schedules are made 3 months in advance.  And if your parent is a nurse, asking them to try to switch with someone at work is like asking them to go to the dentist, for a root canal, for fun.  They make it to 50% of soccer games, dance recitals, and school holiday parties. You know, because most nurses work every other weekend!

They have a lot of “bring-a-dish” parties. Of course, someone has to sign up for drinks and paper plates 😃 But nurses love food!  They could go into a carb-coma at any of these parties, it’s like a feast of every type of carb… alfred-eisenstaedt-evelyn-mott-playing-nurse-with-doll-as-parents-adjust-children-to-abnormal-conditions-in-wartime Medical terminology is their terminology.  My daughter doesn’t say she has “bad poops.” She will come to me and say she has diarrhea. Then she’ll tell me what color it is, and what she ate before getting her upset stomach.  And she’s nine.  Her brother has a penis, babies come out of vaginas, and when she’s nauseated she tells me she’s going to vomit. She must have heard it from a nurse…

Someone at their work is probably collecting money for someone—or something.  Every week nurses are scrounging around for money for a wedding or a funeral, or needing a gift for someone who is going to have a baby (or a grandbaby).  It’s just what they do.

Their kids, friends, neighbors and strangers ask them for all sorts of medical advice.  Growing up, I was never afraid to ask my nurse mom absolutely anything.  From girlie problems, sex questions, to bathroom issues—nothing was off limits.  In fact…have a question?  Just ask a nurse!

They can handle any kind of crazy their kids could ever think about dishing out.  Because however crazy their kids may act—they’ve seen that kind of crazy and MUCH worse from a past patient.  If you were raised by a nurse, they can handle your kind of crazy. Nurses know how to de-escalate all kinds of situations 😃

Until my next delivery ❤

10 Signs You’re the Parent of a Newborn

 

 


200 thoughts on “10 Signs You’re Being Raised by a Nurse

  • March 19, 2015 at 7:05 pm
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    Totally! My mom is a nurse, my sister in law is a nurse, I’m a nurse. We totally gross everyone out with our conversations at meals, my kids know the real names for body parts, and I just dug through my stash of meds in my purse for a decongestant for someone 2 nights ago.

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    • March 21, 2015 at 1:32 pm
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      I’m not a nurse YET, but I AM in nursing school and as soon as someone finds out, they start asking questions like …. “oh, could you check out this rash?” LOL! And I don’t mind!!

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    • March 21, 2015 at 7:55 pm
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      As a former ED nurse, I wasn’t allowed to talk about work AT ALL at dinner…. Lol article
      Marcia

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    • March 21, 2015 at 9:08 pm
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      My husbands mom and aunt were nurses. Both he and I are nurses. Our girls agree to all of these signs and have a few more including not inviting friends over so as not to be grossed out/play 50 questions of what the friend has or psych issues the parents obviously have once they leave.

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    • March 22, 2015 at 1:29 am
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      You forgot one.. All your friends come to you for medical advice. DO I LOOK LIKE I WENT TO MEDICAL SCHOOL???

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  • March 19, 2015 at 7:26 pm
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    I may not be a nurse, nor was I raised by one, but I always used the correct verbiage with my son. It served me well until one day in the middle of Wal-Mart when he was about 2.5 and I was juggling one too many items when I picked him up and plopped him down on my hip. Apparently things didn’t settle quite right on the way to my hip because he screamed at the top of his 2.5 year old voice, “Ow, mom, my PENIS!” As every blue-haired lady turned to look, I was like, “sorry kid, lets adjust”. LOL Out of the mouths of babes. LOL

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  • March 19, 2015 at 7:49 pm
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    Funny ! Question though, how would you have extra Amoxicillin / antibiotic around your house? Don’t we have to finish the prescribed course?

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      • March 20, 2015 at 12:38 am
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        Or Never start a Script until they are dying because they waited to make ABSOLUTELY sure it wasn’t viral

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      • March 20, 2015 at 10:15 pm
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        I can identify with so much you said. I have been a nurse for over 35 years( 20+ in the Nursery/ Postpartum). You forgot to mention all the supplies we take on vacations – every remedy item we can think of “just in case”, though I never kept antibiotics or other prescription meds- I had every OTC we could possibly need. Your post gave me a chuckle! I hope my 3 sons read it.

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      • March 21, 2015 at 6:33 pm
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        We are definitely the most non-compliant creatures around!!

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    • March 20, 2015 at 3:03 pm
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      Or what’s left over in their pockets at the end of the day! It adds up!

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      • March 21, 2015 at 10:50 pm
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        Worked in a Hospital for 40 yrs……always very busy on a Med./Surg. unit….came home with many pens, Alcohol preps., etc. in my pockets….Yes, it really added up at the end of a yr,

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    • March 21, 2015 at 1:44 am
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      I’m a cna, not a nurse, but I actually do have a full round of antibiotics sitting on my shelf! My dentist prescribed them to “help with pain” until I had my wisdom teeth pulled. I didn’t think that was a good reason to take antibiotics but figured it’d be good to have around just in case!

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      • March 21, 2015 at 4:11 am
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        what? Antibiotics would do nothing for pain…. Sounds like you need a new dentist. Or goggle the med and find out they are really a narcotic, not an antibiotic.

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      • March 21, 2015 at 4:24 am
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        Actually, abx cAn help with pain, not acutely, as a narcotic can, but if the cause of the pain is inflammation, ect caused by bacterial infection, treating infection will ultimately treat the pain.

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        • March 21, 2015 at 4:27 am
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          But without being properly diagnosed as a bacterial infection, those should have never been prescribed. This is all part of the overuse of antibiotics that helped superbugs form.

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    • March 21, 2015 at 4:20 am
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      Of course not you stop taking it when you feel better just in case you need some later lol

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      • March 21, 2015 at 10:23 am
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        Antibiotics are prescribed prophalactly for extractions in patients at risk for infection. There are many reasons the patient may be at risk. Hmmm should anyone advise another to save those antibiotics & risk infective endocarditis? Better the patient ask why they were given the script. Then they can make an informed choice. Just saying

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    • March 21, 2015 at 5:10 pm
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      I carry lots of different medication with me which like most nurses ends up stashed at home for “emergencies”. And don’t we all do a little self prescribing and decide that to take antibiotics for that UTI or for dads inflamed big toe?? ? oh and apparently you can never have enough paracetamol. That fixes everything!

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    • March 21, 2015 at 7:54 pm
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      When getting an antibiotic we always ask the DR for one refill, just In case! Wah lah! One extra! ?

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      • March 21, 2015 at 10:05 pm
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        Always ask for l refill…..after all, you never know if one course is enough……LOL ~

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  • March 19, 2015 at 8:07 pm
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    I am the only nurse in our family, and absolutely no one wants to hear my work stories, but everyone wants advice. I don’t keep extra medications to pass out, I’m not a pharmacist, but I might suggest something to take for any said ailments.

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  • March 19, 2015 at 9:05 pm
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    I can definitely relate to these and I am sure that my kids can too.

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  • March 19, 2015 at 10:08 pm
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    This is so me as well and all my friends that are nurses. Can so relate to having the three year old Amoxicillin in the cabinet…..

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    • March 20, 2015 at 7:12 pm
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      3 yrs? I’ve got Rxs that are 7 yrs old. I’ve often read drug co’s won’t tell you they are good for 10.

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    • March 21, 2015 at 1:43 am
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      Last longer in the freezer

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  • March 19, 2015 at 10:19 pm
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    Being the daughter of a nurse and the granddaughter of a nurse, war stories don’t bother me anymore. I have to remind myself stories of gross sores oozing or internal workings of our bodies aren’t normal table talk and curb my tongue sometimes.

    I might add to your list the fact that, as kids, there was no way we could fake sick to skip school. We also didn’t want to touch our parents when they got home because he had a pretty good idea where their hands had been.

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    • March 20, 2015 at 2:43 pm
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      Or to even come home from school their complaints are equally graphic. Rectal bleeding and crushing chest pain are two my kids have used. Try talking the school out of keeping them, lol

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  • March 20, 2015 at 12:50 am
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    Lol, this is so true! I took my daughter (who had just turned 3) to the pediatrician because I thought she may have a UTI, and he asked her what hurt. She replied “My vagina burns when I pee, and I have germs in my bladder!” The pediatrician laughed and said he couldn’t remember a 3 year old ever being able describe UTI symptoms with that terminology.

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  • March 20, 2015 at 1:33 am
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    I was standing room only at the bar in a lounge, talking with my night supervisor. And it was really crowded. And I glanced past her, and the man sitting right next to her was looking at us in horror. And I realize that while he’s eating his wings, we were discussing urine casts. LOL

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  • March 20, 2015 at 4:19 am
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    Reblogged this on CreativlyErin and commented:
    Many very true points, especially medical terminology be the language used and spoken at home, even to our almost 6, & almost 4 year old girls, besides using correct terms for body parts (not introducing this from the beginning can possibly teach them to be shameful of their bodies and end up calling it something other than their vagina, their buttocks, etc. …not telling them the honest truth, graphics withheld unless necessary for full understanding, only confuses them more!) they are well beyond their years in terms of their comfort level regarding the functions of their bodies…and definitly not afraid to ask anything, and describe everything! Nurses or physicians, in the making lol

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  • March 20, 2015 at 12:34 pm
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    Loved this! My Mom is a nurse and I TOTALLY identify. My Mom always worked 3rd softy and growing up, we heard all kinds of stories at the breakfast table before school.

    She made us afraid to ever sneak out at night – ER horror stories of kids who snuck out of the house. I knew all kinds of medical stuff other kids never even thought about.

    I LOVED every minute of it!

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  • March 20, 2015 at 2:42 pm
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    I come from a large family of nurses, respiratory therapists amd doctors. My mom only took me to the doctor when sh. was sure I was sick. I never went to the ER for anything. When I was 4 or 5 I got a crayon stuck in my nose. My mom called gramdma (also a nurse) needless to say I learned how to blow my nose that day. I worked in an emergency room for over 10 years and the things I said people come in for would NEVER have flown with my mom and gramdma.

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  • March 20, 2015 at 3:11 pm
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    Oh my goodness! Haven’t enjoyed a reading that much in a while. Laughed and identified with it, comments and all. I became a nurse while my kids were already in middle and high school. Having seen me get my BSN in 4 years, my daughter, when asked if she wanted to be a nurse, stated emphatically that she didn’t want to work THAT hard! LOL. It certainly paid off, evidently, because we know who they all go to with health questions, right? My husband has said so many times, “stop – I don’t want to hear that stuff!” And yes, they’ve had many many holidays and weekends without me, but I’ve always sensed a feeling of pride and trust from them all; from my youngest great niece, to my sweet departed Mama.

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  • March 20, 2015 at 5:15 pm
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    Yep that’s what we do and I love it.❤️❤️❤️

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  • March 20, 2015 at 5:58 pm
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    Reblogged this on Oldentimes's Blog and commented:
    After years in health care, I can surely relate to this fine post. I hope you enjoy it. For those who wonder, I hope to be back behind the keyboard as Oldentimes soon.

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  • March 20, 2015 at 7:29 pm
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    I LOVE it! These are spot on!! The “medicine cabinet” one, and the “medical terminology” one were & still are really big ones for me and my family. The terminology is more me USING terminology, than them using it. I’ve used many words/terms, and been told “I have no idea what that means”, or they’ll ‘pretend’ to whisper to each other “Do you have any idea what she’s talking about?” (My kids are adults, now, by the way). I’ve also been ‘accused’ of making up MANY words/terms. After being a nurse for 34+ years, some things are just very hard NOT to say them the “medical” way! lol

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  • March 20, 2015 at 7:51 pm
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    Another great post!

    I’m also a maternity nurse. My adolescents always knew when I took care of a teen that day, because I came home handing out condoms and threats. My son would roll his eyes, while my daughter said, “Ewww!” :)

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  • March 20, 2015 at 11:04 pm
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    Sounds about right

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  • March 21, 2015 at 12:03 am
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    dear Lord. I have been a nurse going on 20 years. that also includes 20 years as a volunteer fireman and paramedic. my children especially my daughter can agree with everything. except I rarely ever missed anything with both of my children. they were and always will be my first priority. two thirds of that time was a weekend warrior 7p to 7a every Friday Saturday Sunday. everything else oh yes. in the sibling birth class my daughter corrected the nurse by saying a baby does not come from the tummy but the uterus and she said that in a funny way.

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    • March 22, 2015 at 12:40 am
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      After working over 40 years You couldn’t get steady dayturn My husband worked steady daytime so I did steady afternoon’s when my kids got involved in sports I went to nights never missed any activity was always there to cheer them on

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  • March 21, 2015 at 12:05 am
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    Be careful when you call a Hospice Nurse.
    It could be the last phone call you ever make.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 12:28 am
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    OMG, Shelly, this is SO absolutely correct!!

    A new one for you: my husband’s comment- “I married a nurse-I live at her discretion.”

    Smart man. :)

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  • March 21, 2015 at 1:16 am
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    I will take it a day or two to appease the Dr. Then get a script for better antibiotics, that work faster and are taken once daily. When you work 3 12-14hr shifts in a row there’s no time to be sick and mess with trying to remember taking you antibiotic 3-4 times daily. I’m too busy giving my 6-8 patients their meds . And that is exactly what I told my Dr. I also laughed when they asked me to go in for a Dr. Visit the day before 3 12s strait.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 1:21 am
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    When my youngest was in second grade I showed up for the first parent-teacher’s meeting and the teacher asked me if I was a nurse, or doctor? Nurse, I said, why? “Well Marian refers to her sisters and brother as siblings, and the other day when she asked to use the bathroom she said her bladder was going to burst. Most second graders don’t use the word bladder.”

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  • March 21, 2015 at 1:42 am
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    My son liked the word ideopathic thrombocytopenia purpura.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 3:00 am
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    I have been a nurse for and this so very true! I will use a medical term and my husband just looks at me and says “hillbilly English honey, hillbilly English”!

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  • March 21, 2015 at 3:04 am
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    I have been a nurse for 38 years and this so very true! I will use a medical term and my husband just looks at me and says “hillbilly English honey, hillbilly English”!

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  • March 21, 2015 at 3:20 am
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    OMG this is sooooooo true!! I’m a nurse and my mother is a nurse (she became a nurse after me, waiting until we were all “old enough to drive ourselves to the ER” before going back to nursing school!) and it is so very true!! About 4 years ago we were going on a family vacation to Las Vegas and I took my dogs for a walk at 3am so they’d be good until my BFF got there around 9am since our flight was at 6am. Anyway, I stepped in a pothole in my neighborhood, sprained my ankle and fell on my arm. I got home and told her “mom, I think I broke my arm!” Well, the ever diligent nurse took a quick look and said “meh… It’s probably a sprain or at worst a hairline fracture. Our tickets are nonrefundable and they have ERs in Vegas… Yes, you guessed it! She medicated me with whatever concoction we had between the two of us, slapped some ice on it and flew from NC to Vegas, got off the plane and went straight to the ER… And yes… It was fractured. Bless her… We weren’t missing that flight and I wasn’t bleeding out! Love my nurse mama!!

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  • March 21, 2015 at 3:31 am
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    I am not a nurse, am retired from nursing, med lab and coding, Mom was a nurse, and my dad a medic in the army so yes we were not allowed but to used medical language and proper usage was urged at that time. I was separated from my childrens father and was taking my 2 sons and daughter shopping for my daughter’s first bra and her brothers being younger AND boys were laughing at her, so I told them that when it was time for their 1st baseball cups, I would bring my daughter along to laugh at them. They had never heard of baseball cups so a discussion ensued. Coming out from JC Pennys, after the bra purchase and a pair of suspender for each of the boy, my youngest son says, “Thank you mom, for my brand new testicles”. And yes I WAS given scathing looks by old ladies and old men. Today all of this makes me smile as I continue into y dotage.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 4:49 am
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    I am a third generation nurse! I grew up at the dinner table with what I remember being my mom and grandmother’s “adventures”! I love nursing, and if you ask my daughter’s today, they always say they “want to be an RN like mommy”! ❤❤❤

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  • March 21, 2015 at 5:36 am
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    Hemostats, surgical tape and paper towels for bloody wounds but no band aids in my house – doctor dad and nurse mom, too!

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  • March 21, 2015 at 7:39 am
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    Not a nurse, but my parents were both first aid instructors. I have had almost every experience like that. We couldn’t fake illnesses. Moms gelding jumped on my foot. Taped, wrapped, set never went to the Dr. Now I am a cancer patient and my sister is a pharmacists. Medical terminology and what’s new in medicine are common topics. I think my kids could draw blood for my labs, they’ve watched so many times.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 9:02 am
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    Enjoyed reading all the above.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 9:26 am
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    My sister is a nurse and this is most definitely correct lol

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  • March 21, 2015 at 11:06 am
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    This is fantastic, and completely spot on. Although we don’t have kids yet, my husband and I can absolutely relate to this. When he has a cold, he tells me he hopes I don’t treat my patients as badly as him because I don’t tend to his every need. I simply respond that my patients are truly sick, or, unlike him, DYING and do need my attention. Then I usually direct him to the nearest decongestant and walk away. I get photos from friends that live on the opposite side of the country saying “does this look infected”, and have discussed things with coworkers over lunch that would horrify the average person. Loved reading this. Well done!

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  • March 21, 2015 at 11:40 am
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    Loving every bit of it!!!

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  • March 21, 2015 at 12:19 pm
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    Guess I’m old school. My mom even dragged out needle and thread for stitches, PAIN!! coffee brandy.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 3:10 pm
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    You know you are a nurse when you watch your kids get medications out of a bottle. They never shake the meds into their hand, but instead always pour the med into the cap first then into their hand. They grew up watching you do that and never knew any different.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 4:22 pm
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    You forgot number 11. If you want a day off from school, you have to start preparing three days in advance with vague symptoms just get a sick day. Lol

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  • March 21, 2015 at 5:19 pm
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    I worked in the O.R. In Middle School my daughter had to give a word that nobody would know. She gave Rhinoplasty, even the teacher didn’t know it. She had watched a Rhinoplasty video the night before! Gross.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 8:16 pm
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    My kids knew not to interupt when I was on the phone unless someone was bleeding or lost a body part.
    I work with a lot of social workers now who are flabbergasted at the things nurses talk about. They have come to learn there is nothing sacred within nurses conversations.
    My husband was a respiratory therapist, so there was also lots of irreverence from him too. Happy to say my daughters have a well rounded sense of humor.

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  • March 21, 2015 at 8:17 pm
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    Absolutely loved the article. I graduated from Nsg. School in 1968. I loved my Nursing career.I started in L&D,but Med. Surg.and Geriatrics was my favorite…so much to learn from the elderly. Our table conversations were similar,w looks like,oh mom..no!! Im knownas the Queen of Wound care now,fitting into the Geriatric category.I have my Visco paste,4×4’s,and soft netting..carry every drug (just in case) and KNOW “what to do” just incase!…I admittingly am a Germophobic,and after hosp.visits usually dispose of toiletries,etc. I have MS and walk w a walker,and the “Nurse” in me just yesterday blurted out to a lil lady w a caneand boot(driver),and husband w obvious Parkinsons struggled to get his walker(the cheapies w wheels that dont roll frm Medicare) out of car up the curb,and I held the door to the deli so he wouldnt fall.I sweetly took the wife aside, showed her my brightly colored walker,fold up w seat,brakes and wheels,and said darlin’ (im a southern girl) you need to get him one of these so he’ll be safer,and can rest if hes tired.She politely listened,wrote name of store,and gave me a big hug.Once a Nurse,always a Nurse!!Unfortunately my one and only daughter,cant standthe sight of blood or needles,so no other Nurse in the family! Proud of my Profession,and thankyou and bless you to all the Dedicated nurses in this world! Keep the stories coming!! It was hilarious!!Nance Burghardt Sunny Sarasota, Fla.?

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  • March 21, 2015 at 8:42 pm
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    When I do something completely grotesque at work (ICU RN) my husband and I have a code, when I say, “you are cooking dinner tonight” usually means I had a GI bleeder or a necrotizing fasciitis patient that night haha. He looks at me in horror praying I do not share how my day was and starts rummaging through the fridge :)

    My 2 1/2 year old daughter had a PDA with a significant persistent murmur and when we took her in for check ups after it was coiled she tells the doc, “my heart said lub-dub-swish and now it just says lub-dub!” Then proceeds to take the docs stethoscope and perform a perfectly assimilated head-to-toe assessment. Lol. Love it!

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  • March 21, 2015 at 9:11 pm
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    Yep!!!! That’s us—— nursing 40 plus years—-17 in the ED!!!! Bring it on!!!!!! We can handle it!!!!

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  • March 21, 2015 at 9:27 pm
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    My mom is a nurse and I am a nurse. My daughter could not stand watching any medical TV show with me! Nor did she understand some of my quirks! Now that she is a nurse she so understands!!!!

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  • March 21, 2015 at 10:26 pm
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    Worked in an inner city acute care facility for 40 yrs. followed by many yrs. as a substance abuse R.N….. 52 yrs. total. Would go back to work today, if I could….Have had back surgery now and trying to adjust to retirement….but miss Nursing very much……Had a wonderful career !

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  • March 21, 2015 at 11:48 pm
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    11. If you’re a boy, you get a bed bath once a year whether you need it or not and are annually embarrassed when she says, “don’t be a silly boy, stop covering that little thing up.”

    I attended a boarding school and we had our own “in-house” medical centre with a small ward for minor illnesses etc – one chap, someone who didn’t care for getting out of bed too early in the morning found himself being harassed by “Matron” one morning for not getting up on time to perform his morning ablutions. She stripped the bed while he wasn’t looking and otherwise engaged and as soon as the sheets and bed clothes were ripped back and finding the adolescent boy in a stage of, well let’s just say embarrassment, Matron said, without batting an eyelid, “get up; and will you please stop spitting in bed” and then she imperiously marched away.

    We called him Onan the barbarian after that !!

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      • March 22, 2015 at 12:54 am
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        “…From his mouth.”

        Oh he’s still “spitting” well then is he – jolly good – I daresay you’ll be pulling a lot of night duty these days then – there’s nothing better than a good “spit” when the lesser half’s away – although there’s a lot to be said for us chaps getting friendly with your BFFs too – assuming your BFFs aren’t pink shirts that is and in that case we usually stick to spitting in the bed, out of the bed or anywhere else convenient really!!

        Do hope this has made you giggle – again all the best ~ ‘ter

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  • March 22, 2015 at 12:15 am
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    Mr grandma was a nurse, my aunt, my sister, and now my daughter. I trust nurses before doctors, they spend more than 10 minutes with the individual and find what the doctor’s missed.

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  • March 22, 2015 at 1:11 am
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    I took my daughter for her well visit and the doctor asked if she could look at her private parts. Needless to say my 5 year old had no idea what those were and I had to translate for her and say vagina! The doc looked at me and said, “figures she would know the real word with you being a nurse”

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  • March 22, 2015 at 1:28 am
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    Try being an Operating Room Nurse! Whatever bodily fluid you can dream up ….guaranteed I’ve seen it, touched it, smelled it and probably tasted it and no not at n purpose.

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  • March 22, 2015 at 2:00 am
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    So funny and so true. Oncology nurse for 34 years. Love being a nurse and we are truly hard to impress with our families symptoms and after spending time with.2 dramatic daughters My neighbors and friends are always on the phone or showing up with weird ailments. Life is never dull. Wouldn’t change it for anything.

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    • March 23, 2015 at 9:28 am
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      Yep. Hospice nurse. If you’re gonna complain like you mean it, YOU’D better be dying. LOL

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      • March 24, 2015 at 8:59 pm
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        I’m a Hospice nurse on overnights. When you literally care for people end staging every single shift, it’s incredibly hard to feel sorry for the man flu. ;)

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    • March 25, 2015 at 6:41 pm
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      I have to say this brings back so many memories , My kids still say to this day -they could never be sick cause I would out them. They said if they came in and had cut their arm off, I would say -Ahh that ain’t so bad -Put a bandaid on it and go on. also because I worked in Trauma ICU they could never have skateboards, motorcycles, skates, bicycles and had to be in the other county if some one had a chain saw.

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      • March 26, 2015 at 9:49 pm
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        If the kids tried to malinger from school, they seldom succeeded. Got called to school one day because my daughter had a “fever” (nurse used a temp strip on her forehead after she came in from recess, and was hot and sweaty). I arrived with a thermometer in my pocket, took her temp, and made her go back to class.

        Husband got a lacerated arm while at work, and when he came home from ER, didn’t want me to look at it because it would “upset” me. I was worried, until I took the bandage off and said “Oh, that’s not so bad!”. Then critiqued the doctor’s stitch work.

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    • March 26, 2015 at 1:50 am
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      Haaaa! Family practice here! My husband cut his palm and cut through a vessel that spurted!!! Lol. I padded it wrapped and taped it and called the ER and made him take himself,…. Cause I had to work!!!!

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    • April 6, 2015 at 9:18 pm
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      Too True! My 3 year old grandaughter got a little choked and told her mom that the food “went down the wrong tube” cuz you know there are two tubes–one for “breevin” and one the food goes down.” My daughter said-“gee wonder where she got that?”

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    • May 4, 2015 at 3:30 pm
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      This is so true. I was raised by an OR nurse. She work ER too. I am a CST. But the graphic dinner conversations made me lol, as I didn’t realize that everyone didn’t talk about such things! teeheehee…

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  • March 22, 2015 at 2:09 am
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    It’s not that she’d bring home whatever was in her pockets. It’s that our family doc trusted her to not give out unless absolutely necessary. Needless to say she had samples for all sorts of stuff and even a dry amoxicillin for years.

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  • March 22, 2015 at 3:08 am
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    That covers it here at my house too! My sons had to bleed on the driveway or in the yard …I had white wall to wall carpeting in my house for years … (no I didn’t take leave of my senses, carpet came with the house).

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  • March 22, 2015 at 9:42 am
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    I am a nurse for 7.5 hours a day, after that I am not interested. Work stays at work with me.

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    • March 22, 2015 at 11:34 am
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      Same here, Anonymous. And I always encourage a trip to the E.R. Better to be safe than sorry.

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    • March 22, 2015 at 11:30 pm
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      I was a nurse 24/7 and 9 hrs/day clocked in + on-call (not officially,only after a considerable amount of begging). Mandatory nap upon arrival at home. My family listening patiently while I vented, poor kids, at the dinner table. These are only a few hazards of being raised by a nurse.

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    • March 23, 2015 at 12:28 am
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      You must not be a nurse at heart. It must just be a job to you.

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      • March 23, 2015 at 12:30 am
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        This was meant for the nurse who said that she was not interested after her 7.5 hours.

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      • March 24, 2015 at 5:54 pm
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        So because she can leave work at work and not drag everyone else into her career choice she’s not a nurse at heart? Ridiculous. I made my career choice and I love my job but nurses need to learn how to drop it at the door.

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      • April 2, 2015 at 11:04 pm
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        Leaving work at work is actually a self-care strategy. No one would question whether an engineer, accountant, or even a physician should be one “at heart.” Nursing is a profession, too, just like those.

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    • March 24, 2015 at 6:27 am
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      Wow…. I don’t think I could just switch off like that. It’s a vocation for me. Always worrying about others but not to the extent of my own detriment.

      With regards to the article saying we know 3 months in advance about our shifts erm I usually only know 2 weeks max what I’m working!

      Wouldn’t change my job at all, love it.

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      • March 24, 2015 at 11:08 pm
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        That’s how my job is I know in 3 months in advance and it’s hard getting time off, oh well

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  • March 22, 2015 at 10:10 am
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    Yep can sure relate to that. M y poor kids xx

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  • March 22, 2015 at 11:17 am
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    In this career for 40+ and it made me laugh out loud! Thanks

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    • March 22, 2015 at 7:09 pm
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      Because I am a nurse, I am a more paranoid mom. I know that something small can sometimes be the only sign of something very bad. I like to be safe rather than sorry.

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  • March 22, 2015 at 11:41 am
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    i must have been born a nurse because I’m only a nursing student and I do this to my kids. Although the gross/scary/crazy parts of a nurse’s day are often the best parts. Also: if you are having an actual emergency or just to go to urgent care, a nurse will get you where you need to go without fuss.

    Reply
  • Pingback: 10 Signs You’re Being Raised by a Nurse | scraps from a bemused mind.

  • March 22, 2015 at 2:21 pm
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    I am a nurse and when I was having trouble getting my boys to do their homework I bribed them by teaching them to draw blood. They were 7 and 11 at the time and we’re intrigued by the process. It worked.

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  • March 22, 2015 at 2:28 pm
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    A Trauma Nurse for 25 years and I am banned from talking about work at family meals and functions with non Nursing friends.

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  • March 22, 2015 at 4:12 pm
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    It’s called HIPPA people!

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    • March 22, 2015 at 4:33 pm
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      You can talk about the event just don’t mention names or dates I thought the article was dead on!!!!

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    • March 22, 2015 at 4:42 pm
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      …actually.. It’s called HIPAA.. And no one here has violated it. ?

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    • March 24, 2015 at 4:22 am
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      Yeah, because we share the names with our families and all the identifying information…duh!

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      • March 24, 2015 at 2:46 pm
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        Anyone and everyone who is a true nurse shares stories about their job.. It is part of what makes us a nurse… But if you think we can recite these people’s names and DOB…honey please..There are SO MANY in a given day.. And we have been programmed to leave the identifying info where it belongs.. No it’s not called HIPAA.. It’s called VENTING.. And it’s also called normal unless you want a lot less amazing nurses at your bedside. We talk because we care.

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      • March 29, 2015 at 7:01 am
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        As a Psychatric RN I ran the hospital on the 2nd shift. I have stories that are hilarious, sad & came close to being insane. Sometimes that meant staff only. I am now retired but I miss my job & teaching nursing as well. I can identify with so many stories. My children, husband & I have to be careful of what we speak of at the dinner table as stories that to other’s not in the medical field make some of them so I’ll that they have to leave the table. My one daughter is already labeled Dr so & so & people call her also for medical help. Our knowledge is really passed down & in our cases it has kept us alive. Sally Blatz

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    • March 25, 2015 at 7:31 am
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      HIPAA is the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. The primary goal of the law is to make it easier for people to keep health insurance, protect the confidentiality and security of healthcare information and help the healthcare industry control administrative costs.

      Reply
    • April 2, 2015 at 11:06 pm
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      Actually, it’s HIPAA, and it prevents health care professionals from disclosing identifying information about patients. What part of this does so?

      Reply
  • March 22, 2015 at 4:24 pm
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    I’ve been a nurse for 26 years, loved this read. So true made me laugh out loud!? My daughter gets asked if she is a nurse now.?I guess it rubbed off.

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  • March 22, 2015 at 4:44 pm
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    Made me also lol. Been a nurse for over 30 years. Can relate to comments.

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  • March 22, 2015 at 5:02 pm
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    Lol! So true, seen it, heard it, done it! Even the nurse comments correcting other nurses! Ha, Fabulous career that allowed me to work, raise my kids, and give back. Always knew what I’d be too. Looking ahead to retirement but I’ll never stop being a nurse.

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  • March 22, 2015 at 6:39 pm
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    So true, I was raised by two nurses… this is like the story of my life!

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  • March 22, 2015 at 11:24 pm
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    I agree the author is right on target!!

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  • March 23, 2015 at 1:52 am
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    I am reblogging this at http://www.equipoiselife.wordpress.com
    I have been an operating room nurse for over 35 years — I laughed and cried when I read this. Pegged my life except that I wear scrubs so the coming home feeling contaminated never happens although I have been known to shower at work after a particularly “icky” case.
    I will be exploring your blog further. Thanks for a good read that really resonated with me.
    Bernie

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  • March 23, 2015 at 2:10 am
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    I love everything about this!! Lol, our kids will never want for information thats for sure :)

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  • March 23, 2015 at 2:24 am
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    Reblogged this on equipoiselife and commented:
    It could be seen as a cheater blog except that her article really spoke to me. I laughed and I had tears in my eyes so I think she nailed it.

    My mother was a nurse so I was raised in this fashion. Then I became a nurse and raised two children. Heck for me not even full out blood sent you for stitches. As an operating room nurse I carry a few outdated or surplus supplies so can provide emergency care in the field. I always said though that I didn’t have x-ray eyes and so if the kid thought it was broke we went and usually it turned out it was broken!

    The only one of her ten items that didn’t apply to our household was staying away until the nurse had showered in scalloping water. I have the “privilege” of wearing scrubs so always come home feeling like I left my work germs for someone else to wash. I have been known to have a shower at work after a particularly “icky” case.

    I had one child who could handle the medical talk while the other one was quite disgusted by it. My brother can’t even handle the smell of the hospital let alone stories that come home from there! If the vet had to come out to do something for our dairy cattle both he and my father left the barn and I became the second pair of hands which was just all right with me. No surprise I ended up where I did.

    I have taken a lot of food to work over the years for potlucks which was noted in her entry as “bring a dish” party. I had forgotten that the word potluck isn’t universally used. My family were often annoyed that I made some amazing baking or an entree that they didn’t get to taste! I always said I would bring leftovers home but the work lounge must have some kind of underground network as every doctor, resident and med students show up when the nurses have cooked. The paper plates and cutlery that she mentioned — those are always brought by the same people. The ones who are too busy to cook.

    As a child I never appreciated the fact that my mom worked all night but stayed up when she got home to make breakfast and see us off to school. As a parent I missed a few key events but I also raised independent children as they learned to share at day care and later learned to cook supper with the note left on the counter. They grew up knowing that my phone might ring in the middle of the night even if I wasn’t on call and dad would “have to do” because mom was helping to save someone’s life. I wouldn’t change a thing.

    Bernie

    Reply
      • March 23, 2015 at 3:31 am
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        I imagine there isn’t a nurse out there that ever has enough sleep! I manage my menopausal insomnia now like it was a shift of call and often go to work on little or no sleep which is what I did when I worked evenings (with night call so can be a 16 hour shift) and then home for a day with toddlers. Nap for all at nap time and off to work as they went to day care! Being a nurse has taught us how to manage being a mother. I’m looking forward to reading more of your blog — if you stop back in at mine read the post called Rant and then the Rant Review one as they will both resonate with you I am sure.

        Reply
  • March 23, 2015 at 6:06 am
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    My mother was the best nurse I’ve ever known. She wanted me to be a doctor. When I was nine I ventured to say that I thought perhaps I might possibly some day want to become a nurse. My mother looked me dead in the eye and said seriously, “Darling, if you ever decide that you think you want to become a nurse…I’ll break both your arms.”
    I became a teacher. And a chaplain.
    But now, 35 years later, I’ve got my nurses’ aide license so I can…wait for it…take care of her! And my mother-in law. And also a few nursing home residents as a per-diem. She says I do OK, but even I bring home the good, the bad, and the ugly from my day. I have six kids and they’re all growing up using medical terms. At least I never have to wonder….

    Reply
    • March 25, 2015 at 1:45 pm
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      ChaplainDeb-
      That is hilarious-I tell my daughter all the time: don’t be a nurse – go work at the bank like Daddy. I love being a nurse but a lot of it is terrible too! Not great pay, on my feet most of the day, scheduling nightmares! Hope she listens :)

      Reply
  • March 23, 2015 at 7:56 am
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    Haha I love this , the only difference for me is I work 4 weekend out of 5 . I’m a nurse of 24 years married to a nurse . My mum was a nurse my brother is a nurse , no hope for our offspring !

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  • March 23, 2015 at 9:19 am
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    Hilarious!! You forgot one: She brings home old instrument trays to USE AS A PIZZA TRAY!!!!

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    • March 27, 2015 at 1:35 am
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      oh my goodness, so true. the utensils we utilize are ofte unit specific…it gets really funny when you mix and match your specoialty nurses. just be ready for some laughs…

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    • April 7, 2015 at 8:50 am
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      Not just pizza trays, you forgot the scissors and forceps (single use? They didn’t even get dirty!) hanging on the workshop wall, perfect for those little jobs.

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  • March 23, 2015 at 2:58 pm
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    yes, have to admitt being guilty of a lot of these already… probably the rest too as soon as i have kids? awesome, you made me spit out my coffee by laughing so hard ^^

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  • March 23, 2015 at 3:07 pm
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    As a husband of a nurse who’s mother and father were both nurses meal times were nauseating and the medical terminology confusing, but after 50 years she has retired to drive me insane with constant order of procedure on the most mundane of tasks. Probably they all get indoctrinated and trained by a dictator.

    Reply
  • March 23, 2015 at 4:44 pm
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    My sister and I are both nurses, we went through LPN school together, and graduated 33years ago, she has since become an RN. I was 18 and my sister was 20. together and separately we have many embarrassing moments during school together. (and during our long careers as well)
    The funniest thing that I remember happened when we were in school together (we were still living with our parents) was when Daddy (poor thing) had a vasectomy and we came home from nursing school, so full of enthusiasim for our new knowledge. We went into our parents room to check on Daddy after his ORDEAL, and my sister, not thinking, says……..OH! can I see the dressing?! It shocked my poor Daddy almost right out of the bed!! Yelling “NO!!” and “Get out of Here” (at the top of his lungs,) My sister was so embarrassed!! Because…….as y’all know, in school, we’re supposed to take Every opportunity to learn. We found out that…..this did NOT extent to some situations, especially at home!! Big faux pas!! Poor Daddy was traumatized!!
    Mealtimes was really a treat too,talking about all the things we learned that day after school. Then we both worked in the ER and various other areas that were equally “gross”. (Mom was ok, but Daddy had a hard time…weak stomach)
    We always say people never believe us when we talk about the weird stuff we and our friends have seen, all we can say is……..”You Can’t Make Up This Stuff!!”
    Never was blessed to have children so wasn’t able to “corrupt” them, but, all my friends are nurses and I got to help with their kids!!!! HaHa!! (none of them seem too warped, of course, I am known as “the twisted sister” so…….what do I know?!)

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  • March 24, 2015 at 12:03 am
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    Spot on! My mom was a L&D night nurse for 50 years (passed away 13 years ago ) and I remember most all these… especially the second one!!!

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  • March 24, 2015 at 12:25 am
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    So very true! I worked in a remote community and my son knew what a condom was when he was about 3 (his knowledge of placement was correct, the function of the condom, not so much LOL) His anatomy was anatomy-his arm was an arm, his penis, a penis. He too knew the terminology. With my first son, he would ask if he needed to wear his “stack hat” when riding his skateboard (he was 4) I told him no, but that if he fell and fractured his skull, I wasn’t going to take him to the ER as it was my day off-my brother in law told me that I couldn’t say that to him, I disagreed- two minutes later my son came to ask if I could help him lock in his stack hat-he was taught the possible consequences to his choice, he chose to wear it-without argument! I see it as a win win.

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  • March 24, 2015 at 1:12 am
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    Absolutely love this- not only because I am a nurse but so is my husband. Our children are 17 and 13. The one thing that our daughter asked us to get for her car (it was her b-day present this year) is a first aide kit. Our 13 year old never hesitates to sign us up or volunteer us to be “camp nurses” or some other group nurses. If someone is bleeding they go on the hunt for superglue then a bandaide. Each of them know right where the stethoscope are kept. And both have told us that there is NO way they are going to go into the healthcare field when they “grow up”

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  • March 24, 2015 at 2:27 am
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    This is so true. I’m a nurse and so is my daughter and just the other night her 12 year old daughter had had
    enough while we were eating out. She said, ” you two are killing me. I can’t even enjoy my meal.” We apologized and stopped talking shop, only to slip right back at in a few minutes. We thought we were being slick by using nursing terminology. She then threw her hands up in exasperation, saying, ” You may think you are talking in code but I still understand you.”

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  • March 24, 2015 at 4:32 am
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    I really enjoyed this, especially the vocabulary. My children had borborygmus, they eructated, they experienced flatulence…they loved all the medical words and used them at school. In fact, one of my daughter’s went to school with someone who had a name that sounded like “jock itch” and that’s what all his friends called him. She called him tinea cruris. Okay…so we are a family of nerds, but we had fun with it!

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  • March 24, 2015 at 6:06 am
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    34 years as an RN and still loving it!

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  • March 24, 2015 at 11:22 am
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    And they’re a great source of cautionary tales: My wife is an ICU nurse and the kids now now why you don’t drink and drive…anything (Cars, boats, ski-doos etc), don’t abuse drugs, don’t weigh 500 pounds. Basically they know that what you do now will probably come back to bite you in the butt down the road, health wise.

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  • March 24, 2015 at 4:04 pm
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    We have a tackle box at home and even bring it to our son football games.

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  • March 24, 2015 at 5:59 pm
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    That first one speaks poorly of nurses. She’s lucky her husband didn’t die, as a nurse she should know better than to blow off chest pain. I didn’t even want to read the rest after that. That’s shear neglect and burn out.

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  • March 25, 2015 at 11:51 pm
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    Oh my gosh yes about the terminology! I took my four year old to the zoo, and upon seeing the backside of the orangutans, she yelled ” Mommy, their hemorrhoids are bad !” And she was proud to admonish her Grandpa who told her to get her booty covered up. Much to my embarrassment, she said ” I have a vagina, not a booty”. Ahh, memories!

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  • March 27, 2015 at 5:40 am
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    CNA’s as well my sons call me before calling the Doctor. A good healthcare worker never panics, just responses.

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  • March 27, 2015 at 4:08 pm
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    If your a career nurse or not it doesn’t matter. I am a nurse and I don’t just she’d my clothes and be done with it after my 13 hrs at work. Anyone who has a family is a 24hr nurse. Educated or not….by time you raise your family you will be. You may not talk like you do at work etc….but the skills and assessing every situation are always there. So I seriously can’t believe you can drop it at the end of your shift. If you can I hope you can pick it back up when an emergency happens right in front of you. God bless our career nurses and the nurse’s who take care of their families.

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  • March 27, 2015 at 11:08 pm
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    I am a retired nurse. It is the only job I ever wanted, I loved doing what I did and I wouldn’t change a thing. There is no way I could leave my job at the door. As a result my daughter is an RN,and my granddaughter is a nurse. Bothe of my sons are in the medical field. It’s all in the family.

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  • March 31, 2015 at 4:36 pm
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    I was a Unit Secretary foe 35 yrs and I have lots of stories too.

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  • April 3, 2015 at 8:08 pm
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    I have an RN friend who has a mom who is an RN, and 3 sisters who are also RNs. At holiday dinners they are put at a separate table instead of the kids, because they always talk shop…they can’t help themselves.

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  • April 13, 2015 at 4:10 am
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    So Funny! Shared it for my children. Asked if they had forgiven me for the tomato-uterus demonstrated analogy and my 44 year old daughter said, “Not quite yet”. :) lol.

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    • April 13, 2015 at 4:43 am
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      I worked surgery, so the kids knew they had to be hemorrhaging or unconscious to get me out of the OR. But it’s been a great bonding tool with the grandkids, too. A 4 year old grandson had a sore throat and was seen at the clinic. He called me later and said, “Where Were You! This lady stuck a stick in my mouth!” Even 16 years later he called me asking how to stop the spasms in an injured muscle. Another grandson asked some sex-ed questions, older granddaughter asked about birth control. So thankful they feel so comfortable to ask! After 48 years as an OB, Peds, cardiac, psych, school nurse and nurse educator and raising 3 homegrown and one adopted successful and service oriented adults, I wouldn’t change a thing. TYG.

      Reply
  • May 5, 2015 at 1:52 pm
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    I’m a nurse that was raised by a nurse. It was inevitable that nursing would be my life. My playground was the doctor’s office where she worked until I was 13 (that doctor delivered me). The hallway had a slope and I had a rolling stool…imagine the possibilities! I thought an X-ray film was the neatest thing. I learned about needles the hard way, from my mother, who gave me shots when I got sick and no amount or crying or pleading, begging, or screaming would stop her. My 11 year old son was recently devastated to learn, from my 9 year old HFA son, that he came out of my vagina and not out of my stomach like he thought. You always know the nurse’s kids by the what they talk about. How many kids know all about their immune system when they’re four? My mother started working ICU 25 years ago. I started in Pedi and now I’m in the Nursery. I call my mom on my way home; it’s a long drive and sometimes I need to talk. My husband was raised by two nurses so he was already broken in. I love nursing; I loved nursing school. I’m teaching my boys to respect our profession and what we do. Tomorrow is Nurse’s Day-Happy Nurse’s Day to an awesome group of people that I am proud to be a part of.

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  • May 6, 2015 at 1:01 am
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    I was raised by a nurse and everything that the writers spoke of in this article is true. She passed away on 11/26/99. I miss her more than any one on the world, The one of many things she did was give me the best advice and also taught me medical terminology. She took such great of her family. She was a selfless woman who would always tell you the truth in a loving way, She was a genuine people person, I could never ever fit into her shoes as I grew up. She was educated and was so talented, There is no one on this planet that could do the miracles that she performed. People that are raised by nurses, it is true that Nurses do it better!!!!

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  • May 6, 2015 at 6:02 pm
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    This post made me LOL! I grew up with two nurses for parents and have always been very matter of fact about medical stuff,and definitely never had any sympathy unless a it was super serious! My placement mentors are often surprised by my use of terminology and I have to say rather than this being a result of my training, it has just been a part of my upbringing! My mum tried her very best to put me off nursing but to no avail, I finish my nursing degree in a few weeks and I love it! X

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  • May 7, 2015 at 3:02 am
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    Many of these are very true in my family. I refer to nursing as “the family business”. My mom, several aunts, and my cousin are all nurses. I never really had to stay away from her when she first got home from work because she mostly worked nights and we’d be in school by the time she got home.

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    • May 10, 2015 at 3:10 pm
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      My husband is nurse, his sister is a nurse married to a Retina Specialist. My husbands brother and his wife are nurses…. you get the picture. Every meal is an adventure. There is nothing like sitting at the Thanksgiving Dinner table and having one of them ask their own father about his prostate. LOL

      Reply
  • May 7, 2015 at 4:15 pm
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    Getting a TB booster in the kitchen wasn’t anything weird. Also, my shot record when going to college was my mom’s notes from the book she kept on all of us kids.

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  • May 8, 2015 at 1:05 pm
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    My best friend is a nurse. Could so relate to the horror stories at the dinner table. My poor husband endured when she came for dinner. Perfect synopsis of a nurse . Funny.

    Reply
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  • May 9, 2015 at 3:00 am
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    I had to share this on FB, because this pretty much sums up my husband, who is a nurse. I’m an x-ray tech, so the stories don’t bother me, but we’ve grossed out a few friends over dinner. He said he would add that someone should not complain of a headache or any pain if they haven’t tried taking something for it (other than obvious fractures, etc). Our rule here at home (no kids – just the two of us) is you can complain if you’ve taken something for it. :) Love this!

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  • May 9, 2015 at 5:13 pm
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    I would add one thing: if your mother is a nurse, you are at high risk of becoming one yourself, because you’ve grown up heading day after day about the differences that a nurse ca make in the lives of others.

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  • May 9, 2015 at 7:07 pm
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    My kids were home from school, I was at work, patient bleeding too much post delivery. Daughter (drama queen age) – “We had a fight at the top of the stairs, he almost pushed me, I could have broken my neck!” Me:
    “Then go fight at the bottom of the stairs!”

    Reply
  • May 13, 2015 at 6:46 pm
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    My mom is a nurse. We would always call her for some reason during report and she would let us have it every time we did it. I always thought now what could be more important than a phone call from your kids???? I thought that way until I became a nurse!!! Now? I totally understand!!! Lol

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  • July 31, 2015 at 2:58 am
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    my Mom was Nurse my twin sister and I were Nurses Both Daughters Nurses great to have Them gift ofMercy now 89yrsold still love Helping People even if it just a phone Call

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