10 Signs You’re Being Raised by a Nurse

There are lots of nurses in my family, including my mother, who has been a nursery nurse for almost 40 years. So I know a thing or two about being raised by a nurse…

You have to be bleeding to death or unconscious to go to the emergency room. When my dad started complaining of chest pain in the middle of the night and said he wanted to go to the ER, my mom warned him that it better not be his gallbladder. Halfway to the ER, she made him go back home so she could get her scrubs… you know, ’cause she worked the next day :/ Needless to say, it was not his gallbladder. You don’t have to be in the healthcare profession to guess what was going on, he was having a heart attack.  I’m so glad he’s still around to not let her live that one down…Oh, and she didn’t notify any of her kids until the next morning, because “he didn’t die,” and she didn’t want to wake us up. I found out from a coworker who called me and said she was praying for our family :/

Dinner conversations are graphic. Think your day was bad?!? Asking a nurse about their day prompts a story that is borderline perverse and grotesque.  Hands down, their.day.was.worse, trust me.  And anyone who has ever eaten with a nurse knows that eventually the weirdest, grossest, craziest, and best parts of their day will be retold ❤

You have a healthy fear of coming within a 15 foot radius of them when they get home from work. You may not be sure if you can even get HIV or Hep B that way… But you’ll stay over here just in case.  At least until they strip down and bathe in 103 degree water.  It’s weird how they rarely get sick or worry about catching whatever their patient is trying to dish out, but they are very concerned about passing anything to you. 

Seriously?!?
Seriously?!?

They have almost any medication you could ever need in their medicine cabinet (or purse).  You know, just in case there’s an apocalypse, or a sudden national shortage of Amoxicillin.  It may be 3 years old, but hey, they have it if you need it 😃 Have a headache? We got you covered. Upset stomach? Here you go. Nauseated? Here’s just what you need…

They work weird days of the week, and their schedules are made 3 months in advance.  And if your parent is a nurse, asking them to try to switch with someone at work is like asking them to go to the dentist, for a root canal, for fun.  They make it to 50% of soccer games, dance recitals, and school holiday parties. You know, because most nurses work every other weekend!

They have a lot of “bring-a-dish” parties. Of course, someone has to sign up for drinks and paper plates 😃 But nurses love food!  They could go into a carb-coma at any of these parties, it’s like a feast of every type of carb… alfred-eisenstaedt-evelyn-mott-playing-nurse-with-doll-as-parents-adjust-children-to-abnormal-conditions-in-wartime Medical terminology is their terminology.  My daughter doesn’t say she has “bad poops.” She will come to me and say she has diarrhea. Then she’ll tell me what color it is, and what she ate before getting her upset stomach.  And she’s nine.  Her brother has a penis, babies come out of vaginas, and when she’s nauseated she tells me she’s going to vomit. She must have heard it from a nurse…

Someone at their work is probably collecting money for someone—or something.  Every week nurses are scrounging around for money for a wedding or a funeral, or needing a gift for someone who is going to have a baby (or a grandbaby).  It’s just what they do.

Their kids, friends, neighbors and strangers ask them for all sorts of medical advice.  Growing up, I was never afraid to ask my nurse mom absolutely anything.  From girlie problems, sex questions, to bathroom issues—nothing was off limits.  In fact…have a question?  Just ask a nurse!

They can handle any kind of crazy their kids could ever think about dishing out.  Because however crazy their kids may act—they’ve seen that kind of crazy and MUCH worse from a past patient.  If you were raised by a nurse, they can handle your kind of crazy. Nurses know how to de-escalate all kinds of situations 😃

Until my next delivery ❤

10 Signs You’re the Parent of a Newborn

 

 


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200 Comments on "10 Signs You’re Being Raised by a Nurse"

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Jeanette
Guest

Totally! My mom is a nurse, my sister in law is a nurse, I’m a nurse. We totally gross everyone out with our conversations at meals, my kids know the real names for body parts, and I just dug through my stash of meds in my purse for a decongestant for someone 2 nights ago.

Anonymous
Guest

I’m not a nurse YET, but I AM in nursing school and as soon as someone finds out, they start asking questions like …. “oh, could you check out this rash?” LOL! And I don’t mind!!

Anonymous
Guest

As a former ED nurse, I wasn’t allowed to talk about work AT ALL at dinner…. Lol article
Marcia

Shelli
Guest

My husbands mom and aunt were nurses. Both he and I are nurses. Our girls agree to all of these signs and have a few more including not inviting friends over so as not to be grossed out/play 50 questions of what the friend has or psych issues the parents obviously have once they leave.

aroseriddle
Guest

You forgot one.. All your friends come to you for medical advice. DO I LOOK LIKE I WENT TO MEDICAL SCHOOL???

Tammy
Guest
I may not be a nurse, nor was I raised by one, but I always used the correct verbiage with my son. It served me well until one day in the middle of Wal-Mart when he was about 2.5 and I was juggling one too many items when I picked him up and plopped him down on my hip. Apparently things didn’t settle quite right on the way to my hip because he screamed at the top of his 2.5 year old voice, “Ow, mom, my PENIS!” As every blue-haired lady turned to look, I was like, “sorry kid, lets… Read more »
Eva
Guest

Funny ! Question though, how would you have extra Amoxicillin / antibiotic around your house? Don’t we have to finish the prescribed course?

Anonymous
Guest

Or what’s left over in their pockets at the end of the day! It adds up!

Anonymous
Guest

Worked in a Hospital for 40 yrs……always very busy on a Med./Surg. unit….came home with many pens, Alcohol preps., etc. in my pockets….Yes, it really added up at the end of a yr,

Anonymous
Guest

I’m a cna, not a nurse, but I actually do have a full round of antibiotics sitting on my shelf! My dentist prescribed them to “help with pain” until I had my wisdom teeth pulled. I didn’t think that was a good reason to take antibiotics but figured it’d be good to have around just in case!

JAMIE RN
Guest

what? Antibiotics would do nothing for pain…. Sounds like you need a new dentist. Or goggle the med and find out they are really a narcotic, not an antibiotic.

Anonymous
Guest

Actually, abx cAn help with pain, not acutely, as a narcotic can, but if the cause of the pain is inflammation, ect caused by bacterial infection, treating infection will ultimately treat the pain.

jastorita
Guest

But without being properly diagnosed as a bacterial infection, those should have never been prescribed. This is all part of the overuse of antibiotics that helped superbugs form.

Anonymous
Guest

Of course not you stop taking it when you feel better just in case you need some later lol

LPN just saying
Guest

Antibiotics are prescribed prophalactly for extractions in patients at risk for infection. There are many reasons the patient may be at risk. Hmmm should anyone advise another to save those antibiotics & risk infective endocarditis? Better the patient ask why they were given the script. Then they can make an informed choice. Just saying

Anonymous
Guest

I carry lots of different medication with me which like most nurses ends up stashed at home for “emergencies”. And don’t we all do a little self prescribing and decide that to take antibiotics for that UTI or for dads inflamed big toe?? ? oh and apparently you can never have enough paracetamol. That fixes everything!

Anonymous
Guest

When getting an antibiotic we always ask the DR for one refill, just In case! Wah lah! One extra! ?

Anonymous
Guest

Always ask for l refill…..after all, you never know if one course is enough……LOL ~

Linda Thomas
Guest

I am the only nurse in our family, and absolutely no one wants to hear my work stories, but everyone wants advice. I don’t keep extra medications to pass out, I’m not a pharmacist, but I might suggest something to take for any said ailments.

Bonnie
Guest

I can definitely relate to these and I am sure that my kids can too.

Wilma Stuart
Guest

This is so me as well and all my friends that are nurses. Can so relate to having the three year old Amoxicillin in the cabinet…..

Anonymous
Guest

3 yrs? I’ve got Rxs that are 7 yrs old. I’ve often read drug co’s won’t tell you they are good for 10.

Anonymous
Guest

Last longer in the freezer

Katy
Guest

Being the daughter of a nurse and the granddaughter of a nurse, war stories don’t bother me anymore. I have to remind myself stories of gross sores oozing or internal workings of our bodies aren’t normal table talk and curb my tongue sometimes.

I might add to your list the fact that, as kids, there was no way we could fake sick to skip school. We also didn’t want to touch our parents when they got home because he had a pretty good idea where their hands had been.

Anonymous
Guest

Or to even come home from school their complaints are equally graphic. Rectal bleeding and crushing chest pain are two my kids have used. Try talking the school out of keeping them, lol

Jessica Stark
Guest

Lol, this is so true! I took my daughter (who had just turned 3) to the pediatrician because I thought she may have a UTI, and he asked her what hurt. She replied “My vagina burns when I pee, and I have germs in my bladder!” The pediatrician laughed and said he couldn’t remember a 3 year old ever being able describe UTI symptoms with that terminology.

LeeAnn Gerleman
Guest

I was standing room only at the bar in a lounge, talking with my night supervisor. And it was really crowded. And I glanced past her, and the man sitting right next to her was looking at us in horror. And I realize that while he’s eating his wings, we were discussing urine casts. LOL

eriniscreative
Guest
Reblogged this on CreativlyErin and commented: Many very true points, especially medical terminology be the language used and spoken at home, even to our almost 6, & almost 4 year old girls, besides using correct terms for body parts (not introducing this from the beginning can possibly teach them to be shameful of their bodies and end up calling it something other than their vagina, their buttocks, etc. …not telling them the honest truth, graphics withheld unless necessary for full understanding, only confuses them more!) they are well beyond their years in terms of their comfort level regarding the functions… Read more »
Deirdre J.
Guest

Loved this! My Mom is a nurse and I TOTALLY identify. My Mom always worked 3rd softy and growing up, we heard all kinds of stories at the breakfast table before school.

She made us afraid to ever sneak out at night – ER horror stories of kids who snuck out of the house. I knew all kinds of medical stuff other kids never even thought about.

I LOVED every minute of it!

akayreads
Guest

I come from a large family of nurses, respiratory therapists amd doctors. My mom only took me to the doctor when sh. was sure I was sick. I never went to the ER for anything. When I was 4 or 5 I got a crayon stuck in my nose. My mom called gramdma (also a nurse) needless to say I learned how to blow my nose that day. I worked in an emergency room for over 10 years and the things I said people come in for would NEVER have flown with my mom and gramdma.

trishascoffeebreak
Guest
Oh my goodness! Haven’t enjoyed a reading that much in a while. Laughed and identified with it, comments and all. I became a nurse while my kids were already in middle and high school. Having seen me get my BSN in 4 years, my daughter, when asked if she wanted to be a nurse, stated emphatically that she didn’t want to work THAT hard! LOL. It certainly paid off, evidently, because we know who they all go to with health questions, right? My husband has said so many times, “stop – I don’t want to hear that stuff!” And yes,… Read more »
Anonymous
Guest

Yep that’s what we do and I love it.❤️❤️❤️

oldentimes
Guest

Reblogged this on Oldentimes's Blog and commented:
After years in health care, I can surely relate to this fine post. I hope you enjoy it. For those who wonder, I hope to be back behind the keyboard as Oldentimes soon.

Mary Holley
Guest
I LOVE it! These are spot on!! The “medicine cabinet” one, and the “medical terminology” one were & still are really big ones for me and my family. The terminology is more me USING terminology, than them using it. I’ve used many words/terms, and been told “I have no idea what that means”, or they’ll ‘pretend’ to whisper to each other “Do you have any idea what she’s talking about?” (My kids are adults, now, by the way). I’ve also been ‘accused’ of making up MANY words/terms. After being a nurse for 34+ years, some things are just very hard… Read more »
Michelle
Guest

Another great post!

I’m also a maternity nurse. My adolescents always knew when I took care of a teen that day, because I came home handing out condoms and threats. My son would roll his eyes, while my daughter said, “Ewww!” :)

Anonymous
Guest

Sounds about right

j.fox sr
Guest
dear Lord. I have been a nurse going on 20 years. that also includes 20 years as a volunteer fireman and paramedic. my children especially my daughter can agree with everything. except I rarely ever missed anything with both of my children. they were and always will be my first priority. two thirds of that time was a weekend warrior 7p to 7a every Friday Saturday Sunday. everything else oh yes. in the sibling birth class my daughter corrected the nurse by saying a baby does not come from the tummy but the uterus and she said that in a… Read more »
Anonymous
Guest

After working over 40 years You couldn’t get steady dayturn My husband worked steady daytime so I did steady afternoon’s when my kids got involved in sports I went to nights never missed any activity was always there to cheer them on

Harry Campbell
Guest

Be careful when you call a Hospice Nurse.
It could be the last phone call you ever make.

Gretchen
Guest

OMG, Shelly, this is SO absolutely correct!!

A new one for you: my husband’s comment- “I married a nurse-I live at her discretion.”

Smart man. :)

Jill
Guest

I will take it a day or two to appease the Dr. Then get a script for better antibiotics, that work faster and are taken once daily. When you work 3 12-14hr shifts in a row there’s no time to be sick and mess with trying to remember taking you antibiotic 3-4 times daily. I’m too busy giving my 6-8 patients their meds . And that is exactly what I told my Dr. I also laughed when they asked me to go in for a Dr. Visit the day before 3 12s strait.

Valorie
Guest

When my youngest was in second grade I showed up for the first parent-teacher’s meeting and the teacher asked me if I was a nurse, or doctor? Nurse, I said, why? “Well Marian refers to her sisters and brother as siblings, and the other day when she asked to use the bathroom she said her bladder was going to burst. Most second graders don’t use the word bladder.”

Anonymous
Guest

My son liked the word ideopathic thrombocytopenia purpura.

Anonymous
Guest

words

Anonymous
Guest

words

Anonymous
Guest

I have been a nurse for and this so very true! I will use a medical term and my husband just looks at me and says “hillbilly English honey, hillbilly English”!

Teri fryar
Guest

I have been a nurse for 38 years and this so very true! I will use a medical term and my husband just looks at me and says “hillbilly English honey, hillbilly English”!

lbarnhill3
Guest
OMG this is sooooooo true!! I’m a nurse and my mother is a nurse (she became a nurse after me, waiting until we were all “old enough to drive ourselves to the ER” before going back to nursing school!) and it is so very true!! About 4 years ago we were going on a family vacation to Las Vegas and I took my dogs for a walk at 3am so they’d be good until my BFF got there around 9am since our flight was at 6am. Anyway, I stepped in a pothole in my neighborhood, sprained my ankle and fell… Read more »
Janice Magnusson
Guest
I am not a nurse, am retired from nursing, med lab and coding, Mom was a nurse, and my dad a medic in the army so yes we were not allowed but to used medical language and proper usage was urged at that time. I was separated from my childrens father and was taking my 2 sons and daughter shopping for my daughter’s first bra and her brothers being younger AND boys were laughing at her, so I told them that when it was time for their 1st baseball cups, I would bring my daughter along to laugh at them.… Read more »
JasmineTN RN
Guest

I am a third generation nurse! I grew up at the dinner table with what I remember being my mom and grandmother’s “adventures”! I love nursing, and if you ask my daughter’s today, they always say they “want to be an RN like mommy”! ❤❤❤

tlcat625
Guest

Hemostats, surgical tape and paper towels for bloody wounds but no band aids in my house – doctor dad and nurse mom, too!

Fujiimama
Guest

Not a nurse, but my parents were both first aid instructors. I have had almost every experience like that. We couldn’t fake illnesses. Moms gelding jumped on my foot. Taped, wrapped, set never went to the Dr. Now I am a cancer patient and my sister is a pharmacists. Medical terminology and what’s new in medicine are common topics. I think my kids could draw blood for my labs, they’ve watched so many times.

Anonymous
Guest

Enjoyed reading all the above.

Josh
Guest

My sister is a nurse and this is most definitely correct lol

Meghan
Guest
This is fantastic, and completely spot on. Although we don’t have kids yet, my husband and I can absolutely relate to this. When he has a cold, he tells me he hopes I don’t treat my patients as badly as him because I don’t tend to his every need. I simply respond that my patients are truly sick, or, unlike him, DYING and do need my attention. Then I usually direct him to the nearest decongestant and walk away. I get photos from friends that live on the opposite side of the country saying “does this look infected”, and have… Read more »
Livelife1211
Guest

Loving every bit of it!!!

jim powers
Guest

Guess I’m old school. My mom even dragged out needle and thread for stitches, PAIN!! coffee brandy.

Linda
Guest

You know you are a nurse when you watch your kids get medications out of a bottle. They never shake the meds into their hand, but instead always pour the med into the cap first then into their hand. They grew up watching you do that and never knew any different.

sr
Guest

You forgot number 11. If you want a day off from school, you have to start preparing three days in advance with vague symptoms just get a sick day. Lol

Sandy Brown
Guest

I worked in the O.R. In Middle School my daughter had to give a word that nobody would know. She gave Rhinoplasty, even the teacher didn’t know it. She had watched a Rhinoplasty video the night before! Gross.

Kay
Guest

My kids knew not to interupt when I was on the phone unless someone was bleeding or lost a body part.
I work with a lot of social workers now who are flabbergasted at the things nurses talk about. They have come to learn there is nothing sacred within nurses conversations.
My husband was a respiratory therapist, so there was also lots of irreverence from him too. Happy to say my daughters have a well rounded sense of humor.

Nance Burghardt,RN
Guest
Absolutely loved the article. I graduated from Nsg. School in 1968. I loved my Nursing career.I started in L&D,but Med. Surg.and Geriatrics was my favorite…so much to learn from the elderly. Our table conversations were similar,w looks like,oh mom..no!! Im knownas the Queen of Wound care now,fitting into the Geriatric category.I have my Visco paste,4×4’s,and soft netting..carry every drug (just in case) and KNOW “what to do” just incase!…I admittingly am a Germophobic,and after hosp.visits usually dispose of toiletries,etc. I have MS and walk w a walker,and the “Nurse” in me just yesterday blurted out to a lil lady w… Read more »
Heather
Guest
When I do something completely grotesque at work (ICU RN) my husband and I have a code, when I say, “you are cooking dinner tonight” usually means I had a GI bleeder or a necrotizing fasciitis patient that night haha. He looks at me in horror praying I do not share how my day was and starts rummaging through the fridge :) My 2 1/2 year old daughter had a PDA with a significant persistent murmur and when we took her in for check ups after it was coiled she tells the doc, “my heart said lub-dub-swish and now it… Read more »
Ruth
Guest

Yep!!!! That’s us—— nursing 40 plus years—-17 in the ED!!!! Bring it on!!!!!! We can handle it!!!!

Lynn
Guest

My mom is a nurse and I am a nurse. My daughter could not stand watching any medical TV show with me! Nor did she understand some of my quirks! Now that she is a nurse she so understands!!!!

Anonymous
Guest

Worked in an inner city acute care facility for 40 yrs. followed by many yrs. as a substance abuse R.N….. 52 yrs. total. Would go back to work today, if I could….Have had back surgery now and trying to adjust to retirement….but miss Nursing very much……Had a wonderful career !

'ter
Guest
11. If you’re a boy, you get a bed bath once a year whether you need it or not and are annually embarrassed when she says, “don’t be a silly boy, stop covering that little thing up.” I attended a boarding school and we had our own “in-house” medical centre with a small ward for minor illnesses etc – one chap, someone who didn’t care for getting out of bed too early in the morning found himself being harassed by “Matron” one morning for not getting up on time to perform his morning ablutions. She stripped the bed while he… Read more »
Anonymous
Guest

Mr grandma was a nurse, my aunt, my sister, and now my daughter. I trust nurses before doctors, they spend more than 10 minutes with the individual and find what the doctor’s missed.

Anonymous
Guest

I took my daughter for her well visit and the doctor asked if she could look at her private parts. Needless to say my 5 year old had no idea what those were and I had to translate for her and say vagina! The doc looked at me and said, “figures she would know the real word with you being a nurse”

Debbie
Guest

Try being an Operating Room Nurse! Whatever bodily fluid you can dream up ….guaranteed I’ve seen it, touched it, smelled it and probably tasted it and no not at n purpose.

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